All posts tagged: Science

Time Magazine Interview on California Fires

I was recently interviewed by Time Magazine on the 2017 California wildfire season.  The combination of high precipitation in the winter promoting much fine fuel growth, the long period since last significant rainfall and the high summer temperatures being experiences in Southern California have produced a dangerous situation.  The main unknown in the equation is the frequency and timing of ignition sources. Let’s hope for the best. Read the Time article here – http://time.com/4838989/california-drought-wildfire-fire-season/ Advertisements

Seal Beach Earthquake Study in the News

Evidence for coseismic subsidence events in a southern California coastal saltmarsh Our lab collaborated on a recent paleoseismology at the Seal Beach Marsh using foraminifera to identify subsidence events related to the Newport-Inglewood fault.  The study was published in Nature.com/Scientific Reports and drew coverage in the Los Angeles Times.  Rob Leeper, formerly USGS and now at UC Riverside was the leader of the work. Much thanks to Dr. Simona Avnaim-Katav in our UCLA lab for the foram work. Take home message – the fault, which transects an important built-up area of Southern California is more active than assumed. Read LA Times Article here – http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-newport-inglewood-earthquake-20170321-story.html Scientific paper  is here – https://www.nature.com/articles/srep44615

AAG Presidential Column – Creating and Preserving Actionable and Policy-Relevant Geography

Creating and Preserving Actionable and Policy-Relevant Geography news.aag.org/2017/01/creating-and-preserving-actionable-and-policy-relevant-geography/ 1/29/2017 Ensconced in our academic environs, as students or as faculty, we are sometimes accused of being removed and aloof from the issues of the real world and our research regarded as being of purely scholarly interest. Indeed, there are times for many of us that this may be more than a little bit true. I certainly have not been immune to being intrigued by questions with no apparent implications for the practical problems of the here-and-now. However, today, as often has been the case over its long history, the discipline of geography is being called upon — and called out — because of its importance in identifying and addressing problems of the wider world. Three recent items in the news reminded me of the potential role of geographers and geography in addressing the myriad challenges swirling around us at the present time. First, this past week the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Theresa May, spoke at a Republican Party meeting in Philadelphia. She then met …

AAG Presidential Column – Post-truth World

Geography in a Post-Truth World Glen M. MacDonald December 7, 2016 Geography in a Post-Truth World2016-12-08T08:29:51+00:00 Featured News, President’s Column 0 Comments This past month the Oxford Dictionary named “post-truth” as its 2016 Word-of-the-Year. The word was chosen because it has seen a “spike in frequency this year in the context of the European Union referendum in the United Kingdom and the presidential election in the United States” and “has gone from being a peripheral term to being a mainstay in political commentary.” For scholars and educators the idea that being truthful is now optional should be deeply troubling, as it undermines the ethical and operational foundations upon which we function. In this column I want to explore the turn towards a post-truth world. Two other similar descriptors have become more widespread in recent years — post-factual and post-rational. I believe that these terms are all part of the same sociological and political trend, but have important differences. Post-factual does not necessarily mean being untruthful, it may represent situations in which pertinent factual information is …